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Sheet music

Original

Three Fiona MacLeod Settings. Oliver Barton. A cappella. Secular , Partsong. Language. English.

Translation

Three Fiona MacLeod Settings. Oliver Barton. A cappella. Secular , Partsong. Language. English.

Original

Fiona MacLeod was a creation or perhaps alter ego of the Scottish poet William Sharp. 1855–1905. Some consider her his inner feminine consciousness. he himself described her as “an ancestral seeress” who came through to him. In any case, he went to tremendous lengths to conceal the connection between her and himself and there was quite a scandal when the truth came out that he was author of both his and her works. But the strange thing is that Fiona’s writings, steeped as they are in a twilight Celtic world, are so much more atmospheric and vivid, and in truth, better, than William’s. It is as though he really was possessed by a more inspired soul. The three settings are. The Wind — about 2'4". All parts split except the tenors. Honeymouth — about 4'42". Full SSAATTBB throughout. The Moonchild — about 2'1". This is scored for a female solo. a Mezzo will probably have the right sort of tone colour. and STB divisi choir, with odd solo bits for soprano and tenor. This is a bit tough on the altos. One of them could do the solo part. the rest could be temporary sopranos or tenors perhaps. The settings are intended to be performed as a set, but Honeymouth and The Moonchild can be performed separately. The Wind wouldn’t really stand alone. The complete set was first performed in 1973, I think it was, by the Westron Wynd in the Orangery, Goldney House, Bristol, England, conducted by Nigel Davidson. The Moonchild has been performed in various guises, such as a solo song with piano and a recorder consort plus psaltery. Please feel free to arrange it for whatever assortments you like, but try to retain the atmospheric quality.

Translation

Fiona MacLeod was a creation or perhaps alter ego of the Scottish poet William Sharp. 1855–1905. Some consider her his inner feminine consciousness. he himself described her as “an ancestral seeress” who came through to him. In any case, he went to tremendous lengths to conceal the connection between her and himself and there was quite a scandal when the truth came out that he was author of both his and her works. But the strange thing is that Fiona’s writings, steeped as they are in a twilight Celtic world, are so much more atmospheric and vivid, and in truth, better, than William’s. It is as though he really was possessed by a more inspired soul. The three settings are. The Wind — about 2'4. All parts split except the tenors. Honeymouth — about 4'42. Full SSAATTBB throughout. The Moonchild — about 2'1. This is scored for a female solo. a Mezzo will probably have the right sort of tone colour. and STB divisi choir, with odd solo bits for soprano and tenor. This is a bit tough on the altos. One of them could do the solo part. the rest could be temporary sopranos or tenors perhaps. The settings are intended to be performed as a set, but Honeymouth and The Moonchild can be performed separately. The Wind wouldn’t really stand alone. The complete set was first performed in 1973, I think it was, by the Westron Wynd in the Orangery, Goldney House, Bristol, England, conducted by Nigel Davidson. The Moonchild has been performed in various guises, such as a solo song with piano and a recorder consort plus psaltery. Please feel free to arrange it for whatever assortments you like, but try to retain the atmospheric quality.