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Sheet music

Original

Music, when soft voices die. Philip Legge. a cappella when SATB.SATB, Piano when SATB. Secular , Partsong. Language. English. SATB.SATB or SATB.

Translation

Music, when soft voices die. Philip Law. a cappella when SATB.SATB, Piano when SATB. Secular , Partsong. Language. English. SATB.SATB or SATB.

Original

Music, when Soft Voices die , mainly written in August 2009, is a grave, intricate setting of a short poem in two stanzas by the romantic poet Shelley. 1792–1822. The work is written for two SATB choirs, the second of which. marked semplice , or "simple". holds long, sustained chords in the fashion of a drone, against which the voices of the first choir slowly weave dissonant and highly chromatic lines, producing dense chord clusters. The music, always specified to be quiet and calm, briefly becomes more active at the end of the first stanza as the first choir, followed by the second, seize on the phrase “within the sense they quicken”. After a short pause the second stanza begins almost at the same starting point as the first, but the exploratory chromatic harmonies of the first verse are gradually nullified, whereupon a diatonic canon takes over the first choir, during which the second choir disappears entirely. The last phrase ambiguously presents successive chords of C major, B major and G minor against the second choirs’ anchoring D major before the last chord tilts the ensemble up to the minor instance of the initial key of E.

Translation

Music, when Soft Voices die , mainly written in August 2009, is a grave, intricate setting of a short poem in two stanzas by the romantic poet Shelley. 1792–1822. The work is written for two SATB choirs, the second of which. marked semplice , or "simple". holds long, sustained chords in the fashion of a drone, against which the voices of the first choir slowly weave dissonant and highly chromatic lines, producing dense chord clusters. The music, always specified to be quiet and calm, briefly becomes more active at the end of the first stanza as the first choir, followed by the second, seize on the phrase “within the sense they quicken”. After a short pause the second stanza begins almost at the same starting point as the first, but the exploratory chromatic harmonies of the first verse are gradually nullified, whereupon a diatonic canon takes over the first choir, during which the second choir disappears entirely. The last phrase ambiguously presents successive chords of C major, B major and G minor against the second choirs’ anchoring D major before the last chord tilts the ensemble up to the minor instance of the initial key of E.